Principles of Solution Focused Therapy and Their Application to Audiology The concept of client-centered therapy (Rogers, 1951) has influenced many professions to refocus their treatment of clients from assessment outcomes to the person who uses the information from this assessment. The term adopted for use in the professions of Communication Sciences and Disorders and encouraged by The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2014
Principles of Solution Focused Therapy and Their Application to Audiology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James C. Blair
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan, UT
  • Financial Disclosure: James C. Blair is a professor at Utah State University.
    Financial Disclosure: James C. Blair is a professor at Utah State University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: James C. Blair has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: James C. Blair has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2014
Principles of Solution Focused Therapy and Their Application to Audiology
SIG 8 Perspectives on Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance, November 2014, Vol. 15, 27-33. doi:10.1044/phi15.1.27
SIG 8 Perspectives on Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance, November 2014, Vol. 15, 27-33. doi:10.1044/phi15.1.27

The concept of client-centered therapy (Rogers, 1951) has influenced many professions to refocus their treatment of clients from assessment outcomes to the person who uses the information from this assessment. The term adopted for use in the professions of Communication Sciences and Disorders and encouraged by The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is patient-centered care, with the goal of helping professions, like audiology, focus more centrally on the patient. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the principles used in a patient-centered therapy approach first described by de Shazer (1985)  named Solution-Focused Therapy and how these principles might apply to the practice of audiology. The basic assumption behind this model is that people are the agents of change and the professional is there to help guide and enable clients to make the change the client wants to make. This model then is focused on solutions, not on the problems. It is postulated that by using the assumptions in this model audiologists will be more effective in a shorter time than current practice may allow.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 8 Perspectives on Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.