Telepractice and the Public Sector Audiologist The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) defines telepractice as the application of telecommunications technology to deliver professional services at a distance by linking clinician to client; or clinician to clinician for assessment, intervention, and/or consultation (ASHA, 2005a). Telepractice has become a standard delivery process for the medical community. ASHA has recognized ... Article
Article  |   December 2011
Telepractice and the Public Sector Audiologist
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dale L. Lisonbee
    Kent State University, Kent, OH
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   December 2011
Telepractice and the Public Sector Audiologist
SIG 8 Perspectives on Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance, December 2011, Vol. 12, 24-29. doi:10.1044/hcoa12.1.24
SIG 8 Perspectives on Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance, December 2011, Vol. 12, 24-29. doi:10.1044/hcoa12.1.24

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) defines telepractice as the application of telecommunications technology to deliver professional services at a distance by linking clinician to client; or clinician to clinician for assessment, intervention, and/or consultation (ASHA, 2005a). Telepractice has become a standard delivery process for the medical community. ASHA has recognized telepractice as a viable and appropriate venue for audiologist. They have provided a position statement to guide audiologists using telepractice. The advent of high speed Internet and computerized testing equipment has increased the capability of audiologists to use telepractice technology. Research has shown significant evidence that telepractice could be used to provide many aspects of audiological assessment and treatment. There are three types of telepractice technology that can be used to aid the audiology practice: synchronous, which uses real time technology, asynchronous, which uses store-and-forward technology, and hybrid, which is a combination of both. Telepractice could be a valuable resource for public sector audiologists in the near future. Newborn hearing screening and educational audiology programs will likely benefit greatly from the use of telepractice. If the advances in technology continue at the current pace, telepractice will be poised to help provide services to difficult-to-reach patients all over the world.

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